Errol Flabba Holt - Yes, Yes, Yes / Sweet Reggae Music - Extended Versions - OHM 12" 45T

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Errol Flabba Holt - Yes, Yes, Yes / Sweet Reggae Music - Extended Versions - OHM 12" 45T

14.99

Errol Flabba Holt - Yes, Yes, Yes / Sweet Reggae Music - Extended Dub and Instrumental Versions - OHM 12" 45T

Ohm Records Inc. is pleased to announce the official reissue of  Errol "Flabba" Holt's - Yes, Yes, Yes and Sweet Reggae Music... two of the most powerful tracks ever recorded by Flabba Holt and the Roots Radics. Originally released as two separate twelve inch singles in 1979, both of these prolific songs are now available on one record. The tracks were some of the very first from these musicians as the Roots Radics band and these recording sessions were a turning point in reggae history. The Radics had joined together as one unit just a year prior to recording these songs. Most of them having seceded from other groups and / or producers. The outcome from these gentlemen in following years would change and sculpt reggae music into what is today.
The root of "Yes Yes Yes" is based off of a song originally written and recorded by Bo Diddley in 1955 called "She's Fine, She's Mine". Later  Bo Diddley would work with Willie Cobbs to release his song "You Don't Love Me" in 1961. The words gained popularity in Jamaica when Coxsone Dodd and Studio One released the track by Dawn Penn also under the name "You Don't Love Me" in 1967. "Yes, Yes, Yes" was Flabba's incredible and dreadful twist on these classic lyrics with his signature thundering bass lines throughout putting his stamp on the tune and making it his own. "Sweet Reggae Music," speaks for itself in the title and was created with the same incredible musicians. Errol "Flabba" Holt at the helm, backed and assisted by Eric "Bingy Bunny" Lamont, Lincoln "Style" Scott, Noel "Sowell" Bailey, Dwight Pickney, Christopher "Sky Juice" Blake / Burth, Noel "Scully" Simms, and the late great Gladstone Anderson. Enjoy this limited edition and beautiful double sided release with the extended dub / instrumental versions. 

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Here is a decent explanation on why 45 rpm records should be a big part of any vinyl collection. This was from an audiophile forum so we can't take credit for this blurb but thought it summed things up nicely...


In addition to playing faster, records cut to spin at 45 rotations per minute technically store "more" of the music. Not more music as in more songs or longer play time, just a more accurate copy of the sound.
Think of drawing a flipbook character. If you were given 50 pages to draw on and flip through you could create an animation. But imagine if you drew the same animation on 100 pages. You'd have to flip the pages twice as fast for the character to move at the same speed, but the changes from page to page would also be more slight, making the animation considerably smoother. Now try and apply that concept to sound.
Unlike a flip book (or MP3) the "information" isn't stored on the record as frames but instead as continuous motion. That's not to say that there isn't some form of technical resolution, but it's not the same difference that is achieved by going from 128kbps mp3 to 320.
If you are familiar with MP3 (or any other formats) compression, then here's an analogy: more rpm is like more kbps. More information per second = better quality, in theory.
Since 45's travel faster than 33's it allows for more waveform definition to be put into the format. However, it also takes up more room. More bumps and grooves means better audio quality.
As an example (no these numbers aren't correct but it'll give an idea) lets say that you were able to uncoil the grooves in your record. One minute of audio takes up one foot at 33 rpm's. Now, at 45 rpm's the same audio will take up a foot and a half since its traveling faster. Lastly, 78 would take up 3 feet.
So, yes. Technically 78's would sound the best. There is a limit to what the human ear can hear though, and the hearable difference between 45 and 78 is pretty miniscule. The surface area / quality ratio is too high so that's why you don't see many new artists releasing 78's.

Digital downloads of both extended tracks with dubs are available below -