Errol Flabba Holt - Who Have Eyes To See / Gimmie Gimmie - With Extended Dub Versions - OHM 12" 45T

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Errol Flabba Holt - Who Have Eyes To See / Gimmie Gimmie - With Extended Dub Versions - OHM 12" 45T

14.99

Errol Flabba Holt - Who Have Eyes To See / Gimmie Gimmie - With Extened Dub Versions - OHM 12" 45T

 

1976 was a big year for Flabba Holt having just recorded his first full length album, "Rastafari Time" and beginning to work on his 2nd album, "Vision Of Africa". While writing and producing his own work he was also backing many other artists with their releases including the position as full time bass man for The Morwells. Between his two albums there were strings of recording sessions that led to some other historical tracks. These songs were the result of playing an astounding amount of music all day every day. "Who Have Eyes To See" and "Gimmie Gimmie" were two of the masterpieces that came straight from Flabba's soul. Having a massive amount of inspiration, a young Flabba Holt was ready to take on the world. With no fear and chanting from the heart, these recording sessions were the beginning of a new era of reggae and dub music. At the time the accompanying musicians were called the Arabs, The Cry Tuff All Stars, The Revolutionaries, and The Original Roots Radics. Session musicians went by many aliases depending on the studio and producer they were working with. These were most of the same musical geniuses' that backed Flabba for the "Rastafari Time" recordings in 1975 :  Noel "Sowell" Bailey, Dwight Pickney, Eric "Bingy Bunny" Lamont, Gladstone Anderson, Wyclef "Steelie" Johnson,  Lincoln "Style" Scott, Christopher "Sky Juice" Blake, and the mind blowing horns section of Vin Gordon, Nambo Robinson, Bobby Ellis, Richard "Dirty Harry" Hall, and Dean Frazer. Both songs were released as separate 7 inch singles with dub versions in 1976 originally, and now Ohm Records Inc. has issued both vocal tracks with dub versions on one record... re-mastered from the original recordings. Sit back, get lost, and enjoy!

 

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Here is a decent explanation on why 45 rpm records should be a big part of any vinyl collection. This was from an audiophile forum so we can't take credit for this blurb but thought it summed things up nicely...


In addition to playing faster, records cut to spin at 45 rotations per minute technically store "more" of the music. Not more music as in more songs or longer play time, just a more accurate copy of the sound.
Think of drawing a flipbook character. If you were given 50 pages to draw on and flip through you could create an animation. But imagine if you drew the same animation on 100 pages. You'd have to flip the pages twice as fast for the character to move at the same speed, but the changes from page to page would also be more slight, making the animation considerably smoother. Now try and apply that concept to sound.
Unlike a flip book (or MP3) the "information" isn't stored on the record as frames but instead as continuous motion. That's not to say that there isn't some form of technical resolution, but it's not the same difference that is achieved by going from 128kbps mp3 to 320.
If you are familiar with MP3 (or any other formats) compression, then here's an analogy: more rpm is like more kbps. More information per second = better quality, in theory.
Since 45's travel faster than 33's it allows for more waveform definition to be put into the format. However, it also takes up more room. More bumps and grooves means better audio quality.
As an example (no these numbers aren't correct but it'll give an idea) lets say that you were able to uncoil the grooves in your record. One minute of audio takes up one foot at 33 rpm's. Now, at 45 rpm's the same audio will take up a foot and a half since its traveling faster. Lastly, 78 would take up 3 feet.
So, yes. Technically 78's would sound the best. There is a limit to what the human ear can hear though, and the hearable difference between 45 and 78 is pretty miniscule. The surface area / quality ratio is too high so that's why you don't see many new artists releasing 78's.

Digital downloads of both extended tracks with dubs are available below -